Blog posts with the tag "Depression"

Staff Perspective: New EBP Video Section

We here at the Center for Deployment Psychology are excited to unveil the new Evidence-Based Psychotherapies video section on our website. As part of our multi-day EBP training events, we use many videos to demonstrate a variety of techniques. One of the most common request we receive is participants wanting the opportunity to watch these videos again afterwards to help reinforce the concepts. Now those interested can watch (and re-watch) all these video demonstrations whenever they want. 

Staff Perspective: Musing About Grief

Elizabeth Parins, Psy.D.

As we move through life, we accumulate experiences with death and grief, sometimes other’s grief and sometimes our own.  In 2014, my twin boys died the day they were born.  Their death propelled me into my own very personal experience of grief, but also heightened my awareness of other’s experiences with grief.   As I began searching for topics for this blog entry I kept coming back to grief.

Staff Perspective: Article Review - Combined PTSD and Depressive Symptoms Interact with Post Deployment Social Support to Predict Suicidal Ideation in OEF and OIF Veterans

In recent years, with the rising rate of suicide among Service members (SM) and Veterans, much attention has been given to factors that contribute to suicide in this population.  The authors note that many returning SM experience psychological problems that are known to be associated with higher suicide risk.

Staff Perspective: CBT for Depression – Elements of Session Structure

Over the past year I’ve taught multiple workshops on “CBT for Depression in the Military” to both uniformed and civilian providers, and one of the things I’ve noticed is that participants are often unfamiliar with the general structure of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions.

Staff Perspective: Recommended Summer Reading and a Review - Heavier than Heaven: The Biography of Kurt Cobain

Heavier than Heaven: The Biography of Kurt Cobain

Several years ago I attended a workshop taught by David Rudd on managing suicidal patients in which he discussed former Nirvana lead singer Kurt Cobain as an example of someone who exhibited significant risk factors and warning signs for suicide.  Recently, while reviewing materials for the two-day Suicide Prevention workshop I was struck by how often Thomas Joiner also mentions Cobain to illustrate his Interpersonal Theory of Suicide.  In the references of Joiner’s book, Why People Die by Suicide (2005) he cites Charles Cross’s biography of Kurt Cobain, Heavier than Heaven: A Biography of Kurt Cobain, (2001).  I decided to gain a better understanding of how Rudd and Joiner’s theories might look in a real person I should read Heavier than Heaven.  

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