Blog posts with the tag "Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder"

Staff Perspective: June Shines a Spotlight on PTSD Awareness

June is National PTSD Awareness month. While increasing education regarding PTSD is a year-round effort, this month finds many organizations, including the Center for Deployment Psychology, making an increased effort to spotlight PTSD and some of the resources available to aid those suffering from it. There has been significant advancement in raising awareness, treating PTSD, and reducing the stigma associated with it, but there is still no shortage of work to be done.

Staff Perspective: On LTC Grossman’s “The Psychological Effect of Combat” (As Experienced by a Sheep)

Recently I was invited to attend a lecture by LTC (Ret.) Dave Grossman titled “The Psychological Effect of Combat.” I knew of LTC Grossman because so many of my military clients raved about his books, On Killing and On Combat. I was intrigued to see him speak, but was also quite skeptical about his message and expected to disagree with him at every turn. 

Staff Perspective: Preparing Patients for PTSD Treatment - EBP Education and Treatment Planning

Over the last several years there has been an increased emphasis on providing evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) in military and Veteran healthcare environments to treat PTSD. The Institute of Medicine (2007) produced a report indicating that the DoD and VA lacked evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of the treatments they are providing. The report was not suggesting the treatments themselves were not effective, but simply that both the VA and DoD did not have a system in place for measuring the effectiveness of the treatment in those environments. Further inquiry in a variety of studies indicated that only a small portion of individuals diagnosed with PTSD even received EBPs.

Staff Perspective: “Complacency Kills”- The Link Between Combat Experiences and Safety Behaviors in War-Related PTSD

One of my first memories from my deployment to Fallujah, Iraq was seeing the phrase “Complacency Kills” spray-painted in red on large concrete barriers and signs around the base. This simple phrase was a sober reminder to all who read it to be on guard at all times and men and women in theater rapidly internalized and adapted their behaviors to accommodate its warning.  For many, it not only shaped their mindset and behaviors in theater, but continued to impact their post-deployment lives through the adoption of war-related safety behaviors. 

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