Blog posts with the tag "Suicide"

Staff Perspective: New EBP Video Section

We here at the Center for Deployment Psychology are excited to unveil the new Evidence-Based Psychotherapies video section on our website. As part of our multi-day EBP training events, we use many videos to demonstrate a variety of techniques. One of the most common request we receive is participants wanting the opportunity to watch these videos again afterwards to help reinforce the concepts. Now those interested can watch (and re-watch) all these video demonstrations whenever they want. 

Staff Perspective: The Virtual Hope Box!

Electronic Health (eHealth) has long been integrated into the mental health field allowing for healthcare practices supported by electronic processes or communication.  One type of eHealth is Mobile Health (or mHealth) interventions, which refers to the use of mobile devices for a number of activities that could include Internet access or searches, text messaging as well as smart phone applications that could be used within a mental health context. Although research remains limited, attention to mobile apps has been rapidly growing due to the increased use of technology in the mental health field.  Mobile mental health support can be very simple but effective, providing users with convenience, anonymity, consistency and round-the-clock service.  Often, technology is utilized to complement traditional therapy rather than replace it.

Staff Perspective: The Importance of Self-Forgiveness

As a Deployment Behavioral Health Psychologist with the Center for Deployment Psychology, one of my specific areas of interest is that of suicide.  I am fortunate enough to be able to teach pre-doctoral interns and civilian mental health providers about suicide prevalence, theory, associated risk and protective factors, as well as treatment.   In addition, I work in a military treatment facility, so I see patients and supervise interns with their caseloads.

Staff Perspective: Suicide Awareness Month

September is Suicide Awareness Month in the United States. I would like to use this opportunity to discuss three ideas that are important in bringing awareness to the effort of reducing the burden of suicide.   I will briefly touch on the stigma of suicide, the extent of suicide among Veterans, and the warning signs of suicide as they relate to Service members and Veterans.

Staff Perspective: New VA Suicide Prevention Efforts

We all know that suicide among Veterans is a significant problem. The Veteran’s Administration (VA) recently released information that highlights the extent of this problem and showcases the VA’s efforts to combat suicide. The data covers the records of over 50 million Veterans, ranging from 1979 through 2014 across all 50 states.

Pages