Blog posts with the tag "Treatment"

Staff Perspective: Behaviorism Saves the Day!

While working with clients, it can be all too easy to give into the desire to avoid our own discomfort. We buy into our own emotional reasoning and rob our clients of the opportunity to discover their ability to be resilient. When we are staring suffering in the face, our clients need us to put aside our own fears. We cannot cater to the irrational thoughts and emotions that would have us take a “safer” and “more supportive” approach. We need to trust in our training and the principles that operate behind the drama. Our clients need us to help them to discover these principles in action so that they can begin to understand the way to recovery for themselves.

Staff Perspective: New EBP Video Section

We here at the Center for Deployment Psychology are excited to unveil the new Evidence-Based Psychotherapies video section on our website. As part of our multi-day EBP training events, we use many videos to demonstrate a variety of techniques. One of the most common request we receive is participants wanting the opportunity to watch these videos again afterwards to help reinforce the concepts. Now those interested can watch (and re-watch) all these video demonstrations whenever they want. 

Staff Perspective: On LTC Grossman’s “The Psychological Effect of Combat” (As Experienced by a Sheep)

Recently I was invited to attend a lecture by LTC (Ret.) Dave Grossman titled “The Psychological Effect of Combat.” I knew of LTC Grossman because so many of my military clients raved about his books, On Killing and On Combat. I was intrigued to see him speak, but was also quite skeptical about his message and expected to disagree with him at every turn. 

Staff Perspective: Preparing Patients for PTSD Treatment - EBP Education and Treatment Planning

Over the last several years there has been an increased emphasis on providing evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) in military and Veteran healthcare environments to treat PTSD. The Institute of Medicine (2007) produced a report indicating that the DoD and VA lacked evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of the treatments they are providing. The report was not suggesting the treatments themselves were not effective, but simply that both the VA and DoD did not have a system in place for measuring the effectiveness of the treatment in those environments. Further inquiry in a variety of studies indicated that only a small portion of individuals diagnosed with PTSD even received EBPs.

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