Deployment Psychology Blog

Staff Perspective: Preparing Patients for PTSD Treatment - EBP Education and Treatment Planning

Over the last several years there has been an increased emphasis on providing evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) in military and Veteran healthcare environments to treat PTSD. The Institute of Medicine (2007) produced a report indicating that the DoD and VA lacked evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of the treatments they are providing. The report was not suggesting the treatments themselves were not effective, but simply that both the VA and DoD did not have a system in place for measuring the effectiveness of the treatment in those environments. Further inquiry in a variety of studies indicated that only a small portion of individuals diagnosed with PTSD even received EBPs.

By the Numbers - Mar. 13, 2017

340,000+

The number of student veterans who "have earned over 450,000 post-secondary degrees or certificates using the Post-9/11 GI Bill," according to the National Veteran Education Success Tracker, a report released recently by the Student Veterans of America. The report indicates that roughly 90 percent of these were "current or prior enlisted personnel."

CDP News: Mar. 10, 2017

Welcome to this week’s edition of CDP News! We like to use this space to review recent happenings in and around the Center for Deployment Psychology, while also looking ahead to upcoming events. We’ve got plenty of events to talk about this week, so let’s get to it!

Research Update: Mar. 9, 2017

The CDP's weekly research update contains the latest news, journal articles and useful links from around the web. Some of this week's topics include:

● Combat & Operational Stress Research Update
● Addressing dropout from prolonged exposure: Feasibility of involving peers during exposure trials.

Staff Perspective: Overthinking - We Are All Mad Here

Have you ever said “I tend to overthink everything?” Most of us fall victim to some degree of overthinking.  We search for more and more information, we focus on the details while losing sight of the big picture or we “choke” under pressure even when we are engaged in doing something we know we are good at.

Pages