Blog posts with the tag "Prolonged Exposure Therapy"

Staff Perspective: What Makes a Good Metaphor in Prolonged Exposure Therapy?

Across multiple PE training workshops at which I’ve presented, we’ve discussed the importance of helping our patients understand various aspects of treatment such as rationale, procedures, the nature of the therapeutic relationship, using metaphors. A colleague and I recently discussed the use of metaphor in PE, and shared many of the metaphors we use in treatment.  We realized that many new PE therapists might benefit from considering a wide range of metaphors that could be used in PE treatment, so we present to you several PE metaphors for your consideration.

Staff Perspective: Live Online PE Training, Part 2

Last Thursday and Friday, the Center for Deployment Psychology held an online training in Prolonged Exposure Therapy via Second Life. The CDP’s virtual education center played host to a group of providers from around the country as they were instructed in the methods of PE through slides, videos and interactive role-playing elements with their fellow workshop participants.

Staff Perspective: Live Online PE Training

Last week the Center for Deployment Psychology hosted the first ever (that we’re aware of) online training in Prolonged Exposure Therapy for continuing education credits. We’re very proud of our team of presenters and support staff that helped pull this off. Even more importantly, all of the participants in this training seemed to enjoy and get quite a bit out of it, judging from the post-training surveys we’ve already received.

Staff Voices - Productive Processing of In Vivo Exposure

The last blog entry on in vivo exposure discussed some strategies to help your client be better prepared to benefit from in vivo exposure. This week I want to talk about “post-in vivo processing”. We don’t usually emphasize processing when we discuss in vivo exposure but it is just as important for in vivo exercises as it is for imaginal exposure. Post-in vivo processing is not merely a check the box activity to make sure the homework was done but instead is an opportunity for a client to reflect on the homework assignment, and extract some understanding or insight from the experience of facing fear and living to tell about it. For some, this may simply mean concluding, “It was easier than I expected it to be!” But for others, it may mean evaluating and dismantling some strongly held beliefs that have kept them “safe” from harm for a long time. Give example?

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