Blog posts with the tag "Providers"

Staff Perspective: Transitioning from Military Service to Civilian Life

In my role at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP), I was recently asked about transitioning from military service to civilian life. The specific question asked was how case managers can identify a normal reaction to mourning the loss of identity due to leaving military service versus behavior that could be indicative of a clinical problem/disorder. I think it is a great question and one that many case managers, providers, and even Service members may have.    

Staff Perspective: When There’s “No Time” for PTSD Treatment

After a recent case conference discussion with clinical psychology interns about treatment options to offer patients when the window for treatment is abbreviated, I decided to consult with my colleagues about their opinions , and summarize my findings along with my own opinion.  One thing we all agreed on-for a provider, there should be no such thing as "no time" window available for PTSD treatment.

Staff Voices: Some Common Questions About Pet Therapy

Previously, I wrote on "My Experience With Pet Therapy." This time around I thought it would be helpful to answer some commonly asked questions I am often asked in my discussions of Pet Therapy with people and during Pet Therapy encounters.  In addition, I am including some things I have learned along the way pertaining to setting up Pet Therapy programs and working within the programs.

Staff Voices: My Experience With Pet Therapy

Human-animal bonding relationships have existed as long as humans and animals have lived, worked and played together--evidence of positive relationships between people and animals goes back thousands of years. More recently, dogs were used to help heal psychiatric patients in the military as early as 1919 and throughout various wars up until the present. However, a quick look at the literature examining the benefits of this intervention shows that we have a long way to go in building empirical support for the benefits of Pet Therapy. For instance, the Department of Defense does not currently have a department-wide policy regarding Pet Therapy and does not specifically endorse any project or certifying body. Animal Assisted Therapy is not currently listed as an evidence-based therapy for any specific disorder and is considered a complimentary or alternative therapy. On the other hand, there is ample anecdotal evidence of the advantages, and the utilization of Pet Therapy is growing rapidly. 

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