Blog posts with the tag "Staff Perspective"

Staff Perspective: Preparing Spiritual Leaders to Provide Culturally-Informed Care

Jenna Ermold, Ph.D.

While most of our CDP blogs focus on some aspect of military behavioral health to include understanding, evaluating and treating various psychological wounds of war and reintegration challenges, we don’t often consider and discuss the spiritual conflicts that arise for many of our military-connected clients. These spiritual wounds and needs can have a significant impact and often caring for those needs goes beyond the skillset of a behavioral health provider. A referral or concurrent care addressing both behavioral and spiritual health needs might be the best course of action. 

Staff Perspective: Current Data Regarding the Transition from Military to Civilian Life

Marjorie Weinstock, Ph.D.

My husband, an active duty Service member in the Navy, passed his 20-year mark earlier this year, which has led to multiple discussions in our household about potential next steps. So perhaps not surprisingly, when recently reading the 2016 Blue Star Families’ annual report, I was drawn to the content on the transition from military to civilian life. The Blue Star Families’ (BSF) annual Military Family Lifestyle Survey examines the experiences and challenges encountered by military connected families. 

Staff Perspective: “The S Word” - A Must See Documentary!

Sharon Birman, Psy.D.

“The S Word” is an investigative documentary that tells the stories of suicide attempt survivors, and the bereaved loved ones of those who have died by suicide.  The documentary begins with national suicide statistics, serving a clear message regarding the burden of suicide: "In the U.S. there is a suicide every 13 minutes" These figures help to set the scene for the groundbreaking and emotional documentary.

Staff Perspective: Are we “Pushers”, or “Adaptive” with patient understanding?

Deb Nofziger, Psy.D.

I catch myself in a trap every so often, as my colleagues have, getting so caught up in selling the phases outlined in a treatment modality that I haven’t taken the time to hear the words from the patients’ perspective. And, working with an all military culture, I’ve found that when this happens I’ve usually lost the patient. I’ve used terms that simply don’t resonate with them and they are less willing to engage in whatever awesome thing I’m trying to get them to try.

Staff Perspective: My client says marijuana helps with PTSD symptoms. That can’t be the case… right?

Josh Gray, Ph.D.

If a client proclaimed during a session that drugs with abuse potential are beneficial in managing PTSD symptoms, most therapists would identify this as cause for concern. When drugs with abuse potential are used in response to PTSD symptoms, they generally maintain or exacerbate the condition. For example, the classic client with alcohol use disorder and PTSD drinks to avoid trauma-related thoughts and reduce heightened arousal symptoms (e.g., hypervigilance).