Blog posts with the tag "Chronic Pain"

Staff Perspective: Chronic Pain - What Do Race, Ethnicity, Gender or Age Have to do with the Care Received?

Dr. Jeff Mann

Over the last several decades we’ve learned a lot about the role of bias in the way that individuals are treated in the healthcare setting. Race and ethnicity, gender, sexual identity and orientation, disability status or special health care needs, geographic location (rural and urban) can all have a dramatic impact on the type and quality of health care we receive.

Staff Perspective: “It’s all in your head” – Temporomandibular Joint Pain

Dr. Bill Brim

U.S. Air Force Loadmaster MSgt Terrell Davis* had experienced headaches since he was 15-years-old. He had seen numerous specialists, tried medications, physical therapy, chiropractic adjustments and yoga. He had been diagnosed with migraine and tension type headaches, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and half-a-dozen rule-outs. At 32-years-old, he had suffered head pain for more than half his life and it was getting worse, affecting his work and his personal life.
*Not their actual name

Staff Perspective: Fighting Fibromyalgia with Military-Connected Patients

Dr. Tim Rogers

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain condition characterized by diffuse and persistent non-inflammatory musculoskeletal pain. It is estimated that the prevalence of FM in the general population ranges from 2-4%, with it being more frequently diagnosed in women compared to men (Galvez-Sánchez & Reyes del Paso, 2020). 

Staff Perspective: Living With Chronic Pain

In our roles as trainers at CDP, we want to help providers develop evidence-based skills for working with military connected populations. For me, one of the areas I provide training in is Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain. All of us, whether trainers or providers in clinical practice have our own perspectives and experiences, and yes, even biases about those who have chronic pain. Let’s face it, challenges inherent in treating those with chronic pain, such as slow or minimal progress, can lead to provider stress and frustration. It is important not to lose our empathy; after all, persons living with chronic pain are often themselves struggling and feeling hopeless

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