Blog posts with the tag "Staff Perspective"

Staff Perspective: Understanding the Relationship Between PSTD, Sleep Disturbances, and Suicidality

Tim Rogers, Ph.D.

In this blog, Dr. Rogers briefly reviews current literature examining the relationship between PTSD, sleep disturbances, and suicidality.  Increasingly, research is examining the link between different types of sleep disturbances and their relationship with suicidality (e.g., suicidal ideation and attempts).  The purpose of this blog will be to review the latest findings about the relationship between sleep disturbances and suicidality for Service members and Veterans diagnosed with PTSD.

Staff Perspective - Around the Web: 24 June 2020

As we close out this year's PTSD Awareness Month, we wanted to take a quick look at a few relevant stories from around the web.

  • Overview of Evidence-based Practice - The Psychological Health Center for Excellent (PHCoE) offers a brief run-down of several evidence-based treatment options for PTSD, along with accompanying resources.
  • MHS Mental Health Experts Shed Light on PTSD - Three Military Health System SMEs, including CDP Executive Director Dr. Dave Riggs, discussed PTSD, treatment and programs during a media roundtable on the topic.

Staff Perspective: Moral Distress, Residue, and the Crescendo Effect - Understanding the Potential Impact of the Extended COVID-19 Crisis

Dr. Deb Nofziger

I had a patient who had once been a psychiatrist and left the field to return to general medicine. He was an active duty Service member who'd had multiple deployments. I remember thinking that he had become so burned out from working with Service members around behavioral health issues and combat that he had to leave that part of the profession altogether. But even then, I realized that "burned out" did not capture what I was seeing in him

Staff Perspective: Learning to Live with Danger

Dr. Deb Nofziger

The other night, I was talking with a neighbor about my irritation with loved ones whom I viewed as having an extreme reaction to the current pandemic. When I talk with others and hear about how worried and anxious they are -- and what I view as over-the-top rituals they perform to sanitize their world -- I have found myself getting frustrated with them and trying to convince them that they don’t have to be so worried. At the same time, I am worried about my own reaction, or perceived lack thereof. Is there something wrong with them… or me?

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