Blog posts with the tag "Staff Perspective"

Staff Perspective: Opioid Misuse in the Military

Elizabeth Parins, Psy.D.

A study of non-treatment-seeking infantry soldiers who had been deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq Tobin, et al (2014) found that 44.0% reported chronic pain (pain for more than 90 days). Of those chronic pain suffers, 48.3% reported symptoms for over one year. Additionally, 15.1% of this non-treatment-seeking sample was using opioids. The comparable rates of civilian chronic pain and opioid use at the time of this study were 26.0% and 4.0%. Alarmingly, 44.1% of soldiers reporting opioid use also reported mild to no pain in the past month and 5.6% reported no pain (Tobin, et al, 2014).

Staff Perspective: The Slippery Slope from a Bad Night’s Sleep…to an Alcohol Problem?

Diana Dolan, Psy.D.

Have you ever said “I need a drink!” to a friend or colleague? Maybe you’d had a long, stressful day, or maybe you wanted to unwind and relax before bed. I think it’s endemic in our society to an extent, the use of having a drink – let me clarify, an alcoholic drink – to de-stress, and by extension for many, to try to get to sleep.

Staff Perspective: Counting the Previously Uncounted - Military Spouses and Suicide

April Thompson, LCSW

The Department of Defense’s Under Secretary for Personnel and Readiness recently released an inaugural Annual Suicide Report (ASR). Along with data regarding suicides among Active Component, Guard and Reserve Service members, it also included the first ever number of suicide deaths among military spouses and dependents. According to the ASR, there were 186 reported military family member suicide deaths in CY17.

Committed…Successful…Failed: Shifting How We Talk About Suicide

Erin Frick, Psy.D.

Language is important, essential to everyday living. Our word choices matter as we communicate to others and in the context of suicide prevention, language can mean life or death. With the potential for such dire consequences, how we speak about suicide is critical. In today’s blog, I will share what language is no longer recommended when talking about suicide, as well as what words or phrases are preferred.

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