Blog posts with the tag "Military Couples"

Staff Perspective: Exploring a Suicide-Specific Couple-Based Intervention

Dr. Marjorie Weinstock

While I’ve written numerous blogs about military couples, one of my other professional interests is suicide prevention. Since September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, I thought suicide prevention would be a good topic for my blog post this month. So, when I recently ran across Khalifan and colleagues’ (2022) article “Utilizing the couple relationship to prevent suicide: A preliminary examination of treatment for relationships and safety together” I was intrigued!

Staff Perspective: Military Response to Domestic Abuse - What Providers Need to Know

April Thompson, LCSW

Domestic abuse is an issue that impacts both military and civilian families. All behavioral health providers should, at a minimum, know how to safely ask clients about it and be aware of the resources available for use when abuse is disclosed. However, many clinical providers, working both on and off military installations, report knowing very little about this topic.

Staff Perspective: Military Spouse Employment - A Top Military Family Issue

Dr. Lisa French

I have been a clinical psychologist for almost 20 years. Nine of those years were as an active duty Air Force (AF) psychologist. Additionally, I have been a military spouse for almost 14 years, with three of those years overlapping with my active duty service. Both roles have their own rewards as well as their own challenges. And (as you can imagine) when you combine the two, things can get a little interesting.

Staff Perspective: Active Listening and Military Couples

Dr. Marjorie Weinstock

Recently Dr. Jenny Phillips wrote about ways that military couples can manage expectations and communication while deployed. One of things that stood out for me was the recommendation to utilize active and open communication. As part of an ongoing project, I’ve recently been diving into the literature on therapeutic encounter skills (e.g., empathy, active listening), and I realized the relevance that active listening has when also talking about couples’ communication.

Staff Perspective: Breaking up - And Why It Can Be So Hard

Most of us know it’s important to be satisfied in a romantic relationship and yet, at some point in our lives, many of us have continued to engage in a relationship of which we were unhappy. So, what’s the big deal with staying in a romantic relationship which no longer fulfills us?

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