Blog posts with the tag "Review"

Staff Perspective: Military Spouses and Traumatic Brain Injury – Exploring the Stories of Affected Partners and Resources for Caregivers

In continued recognition of Brain Injury Awareness Month, this is the second in a series of blog posts examining the stories of military families affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). This week I will focus on the experience of the injured individual’s spouse by reviewing related research, first-person accounts, and resources available to support partners as they learn to navigate the often-unfamiliar role of caregiver.

Staff Perspective: Military Children and Traumatic Brain Injury - Books to Help Parents

According to the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC), more than 380,000 active duty Service members received a first-time TBI diagnosis between 2000 and the first quarter of 2018. Embedded in that large number are not only the experiences of the Service members themselves, but also their family members and caregivers whose own lives are often affected by a TBI diagnosis for their loved one.

Staff Perspective: A Review of Braving the Wilderness - The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone

Laura Copland, MA, LCMHC

Thinking about relationship, and always looking for a new slant that captures imagination, creativity and makes me pause to identify and question long-held beliefs, I decided to write a review of a new book that did exactly that. Dr. Brene Brown is a qualitative grounded theory researcher who develops theories based on peoples lived experiences rather than proving or disproving existing theories. In the midst of an era of disconnection, she speaks of cultivating community and the power of belonging. 

Staff Perspective: “The S Word” - A Must See Documentary!

Sharon Birman, Psy.D.

“The S Word” is an investigative documentary that tells the stories of suicide attempt survivors, and the bereaved loved ones of those who have died by suicide.  The documentary begins with national suicide statistics, serving a clear message regarding the burden of suicide: "In the U.S. there is a suicide every 13 minutes" These figures help to set the scene for the groundbreaking and emotional documentary.

Staff Perspective: Are we “Pushers”, or “Adaptive” with patient understanding?

Deb Nofziger, Psy.D.

I catch myself in a trap every so often, as my colleagues have, getting so caught up in selling the phases outlined in a treatment modality that I haven’t taken the time to hear the words from the patients’ perspective. And, working with an all military culture, I’ve found that when this happens I’ve usually lost the patient. I’ve used terms that simply don’t resonate with them and they are less willing to engage in whatever awesome thing I’m trying to get them to try.

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