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Deployment Psychology Blog

Research Update: 17 December 2020

The weekly Research Update contains the latest news, journal articles, useful links from around the web. Some of this week's topics include: 

● The impact of family stressors and resources on military spouse’s perception of post-deployment reunion stress.
● An advanced perspective on moral challenges and their health-related outcomes through an integration of the moral distress and moral injury theories.
● Coping and Mental Health Differences among Active Duty Service Members and Their Spouses with High and Low Levels of Marital Warmth.

Staff Perspective: Not Home for the Holidays

As a military Veteran and a military spouse, deployments were an accepted and many times anticipated part of my life. I met and married my Marine husband in Jacksonville, North Carolina. He was assigned to a Marine Special Ops Command and deployed regularly. For years two through six of our marriage, my husband was gone 10 months out of every year. Throughout the years, he has missed every holiday at least once. For some, I don’t think he has ever been home.  As I recently reflected on these missed holidays and the challenges that went along with them, I came up with a list of my 10 Holiday Survival Tips for a military family.

    Research Update: 10 December 2020

    Research Update Icon

    The weekly Research Update contains the latest news, journal articles, useful links from around the web. Some of this week's topics include: 
    ● Exploring the impact of COVID-19 and restrictions to daily living as a result of social distancing within Veterans with pre-existing mental health difficulties.
    ● Rates and Predictors of Deterioration in a Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Reducing Suicidal Thoughts.
    ● Magnitude of problematic anger and its predictors in the Millennium Cohort.

    Staff Perspective: The Evolution of Programs Supporting Military Family Resilience

    Aptil Thompson, LCSW

    Military families must be prepared for frequent moves, separations from Service members during deployments, and other challenges which arise when living far away from friends and family. Regardless of branch of service, physical location or circumstance, there is usually a person or resource which exists to assist with most situations which arise. While it may feel like these programs have been around forever, the reality is that these programs have been evolving over time. Today there is recognition among military leaders that family support is critical to military readiness and retention.

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